Posts Tagged ‘Prussian schools’

Has the American public education system failed?

To answer this question honestly, we must look at its original goals and objectives.

Our intellectual elites brought a feral species to America’s shores.

This is not the feral species I refer to.

The goal of introducing this foreign species, compulsory Prussian schooling, was to disrupt the American spirit of freedom, individualism, and self-reliance.  It worked.  As John Talyor Gatto writes,

“The structure of American schooling, 20th century style, began in 1806 when Napoleon’s amateur soldiers beat the professional soldiers of Prussia at the battle of Jena. When your business is selling soldiers, losing a battle like that is serious. Almost immediately afterwards a German philosopher named Fichte delivered his famous “Address to the German Nation” which became one of the most influential documents in modern history. In effect he told the Prussian people that the party was over, that the nation would have to shape up through a new Utopian institution of forced schooling in which everyone would learn to take orders.

So the world got compulsion schooling at the end of a state bayonet for the first time in human history; modern forced schooling started in Prussia in 1819 with a clear vision of what centralized schools could deliver:

1. Obedient soldiers to the army;
2. Obedient workers to the mines;
3. Well subordinated civil servants to government;
4. Well subordinated clerks to industry;
5. Citizens who thought alike about major issues.

Institutional forced schooling was a foreign, feral species at America’s founding.  Since the beginnings of our experiment we call America, up until the mid-nineteenth century, government institutional schooling didn’t exist.  It was a non-native species introduced in our society from a foreign land.  Like other introduced species, it has disrupted our entire educational ecosystem.  It has successfully contributed to the extinction of an indigenous species called self-education.  In our domesticated society, we call institutional schooling education.  However, the goal of introducing this feral organism was not to educate, but to control.

Modern schooling, at all levels, pridefully struts as true education.  Discovering truth and debunking the myth of forced schooling is discouraged by all who have a financial stake in the lie.  I love how Linda Schrock Taylor puts it, “The circle of Money-Reinforcing-Ignorance continues with it’s ever-widening diameter of destruction.”  The stone of government education was tossed into the pond of America and created a tsunami of useful idiots dependent on the waves of government largess.

I guess I’ve become desensitized to the dependence on the government teat taught in schools.  Then I remember my raising.  Images of my self-taught, determined, moral parents come to mind.  Were they perfect parents?  Not hardly.  But they taught life lessons.  I say taught, but what really took place was I caught the lessons.  I spent time with them.  It’s what families used to do.

Today’s fast paced life needs to be simplified.  Kids don’t have much time to catch lessons from home or through interactions with others outside their specific age group.  Teachers prevent it.  We keep our mini-prisoners locked up in fortified walls all day and send hours of work home to occupy any free time Dick and Jane might have left to actually learn things from non-State-approved teachers.  It’s deliberate.  The introduction of this feral species, forced schooling, is the destroyer of families and any hope of true learning.

Yesterday, I was asked by a fellow teacher to watch her class for a moment while she attended to something down the hall.  I like these opportunities to cover for teachers.  She had a lot of “gifted” kids waiting for her to return.  Why not stir them up a bit.  I asked what they were doing.  Apparently, they were getting ready to play a game for a Social Studies enrichment class.  In our school, this is a time devoted to enrichment before the “real” classes start each day.  I asked if her S.S. enrichment class was fun.  They thought it was because they played games.  “Are her regular classes fun?”  They responded in unison, “NO!”  “Why,” I asked.  The reasons given were because we do boring stuff and she gives tons of homework.  I told them that I don’t believe in homework and don’t assign it.  “You liar,” was what they wanted to say but restrained the impulse.  They are “gifted” after all.  I briefly explored the concept of schools using “their” time at home.  Everyone agreed it was a stupid arrangement.  “Why not do “homework” during the school hours allowing you guys to learn what you want at home since you can’t learn what you want at school?  Just a thought.”  The discussion ended with Mrs. T’s return.

This is just one illustration of the destruction caused by the invasive species called forced schooling.  The teacher just mentioned is a great person and fun to be around.  But she has to jump through the federally mandated hoops of teachology to keep her job.

Assembly line schooling and education are not compatible.  Real education takes place voluntarily.  Forcing kids to “learn” is called schooling.  We learn only when we want to learn.  My advice to parents wanting the best education for their children is to return the lost species of self-taught, self-educated, interest-led learning.  This is the only hope of bringing balance back to your child’s learning environment.

“Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school. It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education. ” – Albert Einstein

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